BSOD fix – Ryzen with dedicated AMD GPU

Recently, I’ve been experiencing many BSODs in Windows.
I’ve had a few different errors such like “KMode_Exception_Not_Handled” and “TCPIP.sys” which ultimately threw up Kernel Power errors in Event Viewer.

After a few searches, the errors pointed to driver issues. This started to happen soon after upgrading to the latest Windows 10 version.

Starting with the network driver, downloaded the package from the motherboard’s site and installed it, but the BSODs carried on happening.
I then decided to reinstall both graphics drivers and chipset drivers from the AMD site.
Alas, the BSODs persisted.

Driver Meltdown

I decided to go down the “Old School” route by uninstalling the motherboard, AMD GPU and AMD Chipset drivers completely. I then used CCleaner to clear the registry and deleted the AMD folder located in C:\AMD.

Fully cleaned of old drivers, I installed all motherboard drivers, and then installed AMD Ryzen Chipset drivers BEFORE finally installing the AMD GPU drivers.

So far, after a few reboots and some good hours of usage, the system seems to be behaving itself! Until I turned it on the next day and I was getting BSOD after BSOD.

The drivers weren’t the problem.

Testing

At this point, there wasn’t much more I could do more in regards to the drivers. Clearly, there was an issue somewhere else and I’ve exhausted the “easy” options so far. A lot of the errors seem to point loosely to perhaps bad RAM corrupting the drivers or the filesystem.

Going back to basics, I tested the system.

  • CHKDSK on drives – no issues
  • MEMTEST86+ – 8 passes no issues
  • Windows Shell “SFC” scan – no issues
  • Windows Memory Diagnostic test – 1 pass no issues
  • Reseated the RAM
  • Reseated the GPU
  • Stress test system with 3DMark – 1 BSOD, 1 PASS
  • Disabled some devices like GPU audio output and onboard sound in case of conflict

At this point, I had a few things to think about. Overwealmingly, most of the tests had passed.

  • Memory was good
  • Storage was good
  • Windows installation was good (apparently)

Which lead me to believe the possibility of these conclusions:

  • Bad GPU – BSOD ATI related errors, faulty hardware?
  • Bad Motherboard – BSOD memory-related errors?
  • Bad CPU – BSOD memory-related errors?
  • Bad PSU – Event Veiwer Kernel Power errors?
  • Dodgy Windows update – corruption?

Whilst pondering these grim posibilities, I checked the drivers again on the motherboard’s website in hope of a new driver release which may solve my issues. Almost a week prior, there had been a new BIOS update released.

Fix

That’s when the penny dropped; the newest chipset drivers “might” not be working properly with the older motherboard firmware!
This was another completely reasonable notion that hadn’t occurred to me since the release date on the BIOS was only a couple of days ago but I’ve been having this issue for a couple of weeks. The morbid conclusion of a hardware failure (although, not impossible), had now left my mind, and was sure that this was the cause.

Before any BIOS update, reset back to default configurations.
I updated the BIOS, rebooted and maticulously went through the options to roughly gain my previous configurations. Booted back into Windows and no BSOD (yet).

I decided to do another 3DMark stress test, just to give it the computer something to worry about. It went to 1 point above the last test.

A couple of restarts and hours of usage after, no sign of any issues. I re-enabled the devices that I had previously disabled and carried on to use the computer normally.

The system now seems solid, and not an error in sight yet. This is positive and I am confident that the new BIOS has fixed the stability issues

To conclude, the newer drivers didn’t play nice with the older firmware, and the new BIOS seems to have solved the problem. But this highlights some other concerns…