Changing Pagefile (Virtual Memory) settings in Windows 10

The Pagefile is a file used by Windows that is kept on the hard-drive. Pagefile is also known as Virtual Memory. It acts as an additional cache for things that might be kept in RAM, but stored this way because either RAM is too full or the data might be needed to made persistent.

If you frequently run out of RAM, increasing the pagefile will help to keep your programs running properly could stop crashes caused by low memory.

Some things you need to know

  • Data stored in the in the Pagefile is not optimal as hard-drives are much slower to access then in physical RAM.
  • Important: Pagefile/Virtual Memory is not recomended on SSDs as the file can be written to and read from fairly frequently and can cause premature wear on the drive. If you’re not worried about wear, you may still set a page file.
    You may also move the pagefile to a mechanical drive or set the file to a static amount.
    Also to note: as SSD tech matures, the agility of flash increases thus lowering potential wear.

Changing the settings

Use Cortana to search for “Advanced system settings“:

Search Cortana: advanced system settings
Search Cortana: advanced system settings

Clicking into Advanced system settings will bring up the “System Properties” view. In the “Advanced” tab, click “Settings…” under the “Performance” section:

System Properties: Advanced
System Properties: Advanced

This will bring up the “Performance Options” view. Continue to the pagefile settings by clicking “Change…” under “Virtual Memory” in the “Advanced” tab:

Performance Options: Virtual Memory
Performance Options: Virtual Memory

Lastly, you should be presented with the “Virtual Memory” view where you will be able to control your pagefile settings:

Virtual Memory view
Virtual Memory view

You can set a static size, move the pagefile to another drive or simply let Windows take control of the virtual memory with dynamic allocation.

Internal Storage – A Ponder At Prices

Anyone in the market for a harddrive at the moment may be having a hard time. It’s not as simple as it once was; you’ll be looking at many different factors.

Speed, reliability, capacity, bus interface, and more importantly price.

You’ll have an even harder time if you already have an SSD and a traditional harddrive. If the SSD fails, it’s a no brainer. But how about if your HDD is on the way out? What do you replace it with? This question is what I’m asking.

For the time being, I’m negating alot of the variables that’s been mentioned and just focusing on price. I’ve trawled through almost all the harddrives on one particular UK computer retailer and started to play around with the numbers. I’ve concentrated again on only SATA devices as they are my most likely replacement.

On average, they all look to be on a linear price point when it comes to GB per £; except those of smaller capacity. At this level, I am talking about the jump in price of HDD 0.5 – 1tb and in SSD, 60-120 GB. in both cases, the “sweetspot” is the latter with a small jump in price for double the capacity. It’s both weird and confusing to think there is a genuine demand for a lesser product. It’s not so obvious in the following graph as this is a combined average of many products in the same category.

Comparison of SATA drive prices – December 2016

Again, there are 2 more interesting points with this graph. The jump in price for SSD products around the 1TB capacity and the striking difference between capacity of the top end scales of both SSD and HDD. SSD has yet, a long way to go.

Now lastly, I have picked desktop grade components for these results with a mixture of both top and bottom end products. Some lines of drive had really poor reveiws and others, really good. They were all sourced from the same site and in my veiw gives use an accurate comparison of prices in the UK.

This may well be day and night for some, but it will be interesting to do another comparison in a year to see how far things have moved forwards. If someone were to tell me we’re at a data crossroads, I couldn’t deny that.